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  • IPR render the scene again. You should now see the TFD container volume rendered correctly.
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Lighting

Lighting

We will now look at improving the lighting and reducing noise in the scene.

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Volume Noise

Volume Noise

There is still some noise within the TFD container itself. To improve this noise we need to increase the number of volume samples for the light.

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Volume Indirect

Volume Indirect

Volume Indirect can be found in the samples section of the Render Settings window. By default, C4DtoA will not compute indirect lighting of a volume such as a TFD container, as it is computationally very expensive. In the next step, we will demonstrate the effect of adjusting 'volume indirect' samples.

  • Position a sphere inside the TFD container and assign a Standard shader with a high amount of emission. Render the scene with and without any Volume Indirect samples (ensure that Volume Ray Depth is above 1). You should be able to see a difference in the overall illumination of the TFD container. Increasing the amount of Volume Indirect samples will reduce any noise associated with this effect. Bear in mind that increasing this value above 0 will dramatically increase render times.

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step sizestep sizeStep Size
Step Size

Step Size

C4DtoA will render the TFD container with a default step size of 10 cm. If the size is too large, the ray marching will skip details in the volume and you may notice aliasing, bias or banding within the TFD container. A way to fix this problem is to add an Arnold tag to the TFD container and reduce the step size to a smaller value, such as 1 cm. Smaller (and therefore more accurate) steps will increase render times while larger steps will render more quickly. The step size is an absolute unit, not relative, and therefore an appropriate step size also depends on the scale of the scene.

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